Under Armour debuts ‘made in the U.S.’ gear — and tests what we think we know about manufacturing in America

under-armour-debuts-made-in-the-u-s-gear

The black sports bra and matching leggings that Under Armour began selling Monday don’t look particularly distinctive from the rest of the workout attire on its website.

But, in fact, the garments are different in a key way.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/business/wp/2017/01/30/under-armour-debuts-made-in-the-u-s-gear-and-tests-what-we-think-we-know-about-manufacturing-in-america/?utm_term=.f77e21b05b08&wpisrc=nl_most-draw8&wpmm=1

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Under Armour debuts ‘made in the U.S.’ gear — and tests what we think we know about manufacturing in America

Why White? The Color Crossed Party Lines — and Into Newsrooms

Melania Trump
Melania Trump wore white on election night. (Photo: Getty Images)

The newsrooms and election headquarters were whitewashed last night, thanks to something that was more that just a wardrobe choice.

Hillary Clinton, Melania Trump, Savannah Guthrie and Dana Bash all rocked the noncolor on election night, and it probably wasn’t a coincidence.

https://www.yahoo.com/style/why-white-the-color-crossed-party-lines-and-into-newsrooms-202815840.html

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Why White? The Color Crossed Party Lines — and Into Newsrooms

What impact will a Trump presidency have on the luxury market?

Donald Trump’s economic and trade policies may create challenges for luxury activities

As United States President-elect Donald Trump prepares to take office next January, luxury marketers will have to recalibrate their strategies and wonder if the billionaire will keep all his campaign promises.

What impact will a Trump presidency have on the luxury market?

What impact will a Trump presidency have on the luxury market?

#Election2016 USA

  • screen-shot-2016-11-08-at-08-45-55
  • Not since NAFTA has US manufacturing been such a hot topic in politics. There are a handful of substantive issues that have come to define this election cycle, one being the loss and possible return of US manufacturing jobs in sectors from automobiles to apparel.

    In the 1960s, more than 95 percent of apparel bought in the US was made in the US. But increased free trade with China, starting in the 1980s, pushed that number down significantly. In 2015, 97 percent of clothes sold in the US were imported, not just from China, but also from other offshore manufacturing centres like Bangladesh, Vietnam, India and Indonesia.

    Now, after years of marketing messages proclaiming product quality and local job creation amongst the benefits of American-made goods, voters are asking: Doesn’t bringing large swaths of manufacturing activity back to the US make sense, for consumers, the economy and society at large?

    BoF examines the disadvantages and opportunities of producing clothing in America [Link in bio]. #Election2016

  • https://www.businessoffashion.com/articles/intelligence/the-myth-of-made-in-america-ttp-agreement
#Election2016 USA