Why futurecraft 4D shows Adidas isn’t playing defense when it comes to Fashion Tech

These recent years, Adidas’ stances in favour of a movement born from the use of new technologies have been both numerous and surprising. This bet has seen the brand collaborating with tech companies from time to time, in order to create pieces inspired by data from athletes, tailor-made for them. These commitments, destined to make the brand one of the most prominent when it comes to conceive innovative development methods, contributed to give the german manufacturer an undeniable legitimacy. With the creation of the future craft 4D, the brand with the 3 stripes aims at revolutionise product conception, with help from the molecular science field, through its collaboration with the californien tech company CARBON, creator of the 3D Digital Light Synthesis impression method.

http://www.clausette.cc/futurecraft-4d/#

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Why futurecraft 4D shows Adidas isn’t playing defense when it comes to Fashion Tech

What It’s Like to Wear Comme des Garçons’ Craziest Pieces

Rei Kawakubo’s fascinating, reality-defying designs for Comme des Garçons are captivating on the runway, and will surely draw crowds to the Costume Institute next month. But if you’re the one wearing the three-armed jacket, pencil in extra time for sidewalk interrogations. “You have to really plan ahead how you’re going to get from point A to point B, and be ready for confrontations and conversations and people interacting” with what you’re wearing, says Michelle Elie, the designer and street-style star who regularly wears Kawakubo’s most outré designs. Elie once got into a taxi wearing one of the sanguine pieces from the Blood and Roses collection. Her cabdriver told her, “I don’t understand what you’re wearing, but I do have to say you look exceptionally outstanding, and keep it up.” When she tried to fashion-splain Comme des Garçons to him, “he didn’t know much about it, but he did say it was the best thing he’d seen all day!” she recalls.

http://nymag.com/thecut/2017/05/comme-des-garcons-street-style.html

What It’s Like to Wear Comme des Garçons’ Craziest Pieces

The Met Gala Exposed Just How Boring Corporate Fashion Has Become

We’ve long since moved past the point where celebrities dressed for themselves, and expressed a kind of kooky personal style, for awards shows. Now that almost every A-lister is the face of a brand or has a collaboration to promote, gaming the red carpet has become a less and less thrilling exercise, and the swan-dress moments are few and far between. But fashion’s creeping dullness, its risk aversion, and its preference for the blandly tasteful over the statement-making have never been thrown into such high relief as at last night’s Met gala.

http://nymag.com/thecut/2017/05/met-gala-2017-fashion-analysis.html

The Met Gala Exposed Just How Boring Corporate Fashion Has Become

What It’s Like to Wear Comme des Garçons’ Craziest Pieces

Rei Kawakubo’s fascinating, reality-defying designs for Comme des Garçons are captivating on the runway, and will surely draw crowds to the Costume Institute next month. But if you’re the one wearing the three-armed jacket, pencil in extra time for sidewalk interrogations. “You have to really plan ahead how you’re going to get from point A to point B, and be ready for confrontations and conversations and people interacting” with what you’re wearing, says Michelle Elie, the designer and street-style star who regularly wears Kawakubo’s most outré designs. Elie once got into a taxi wearing one of the sanguine pieces from the Blood and Roses collection. Her cabdriver told her, “I don’t understand what you’re wearing, but I do have to say you look exceptionally outstanding, and keep it up.” When she tried to fashion-splain Comme des Garçons to him, “he didn’t know much about it, but he did say it was the best thing he’d seen all day!” she recalls.

http://nymag.com/thecut/2017/05/comme-des-garcons-street-style.html

What It’s Like to Wear Comme des Garçons’ Craziest Pieces

Is Politics Something “à la Mode”?

NYFW is now over and we have spotted one major trend: politics. Unexpected? Not really!

The world has recently been living a real political turmoil, a turmoil which climax was probably the election of Donald Trump as President of the United States. As people fear for the dismantling of democracy, some of them chose to advocate for their fundamental rights and liberties. Nothing of an unprecedented situation…

However, what appears to be more original is fashion’s recent implication in these political matters. Even if some designers had already voiced their claims, what was really peculiar here was the generalisation of the political concern. Raf Simons coined: “When you have a voice, you should use it”, and this seems to epitomise the spirit of the designers for NYFW this season. NYFW was hence the occasion for designers to display rather unequivocal political point of views, but always sticking to their aesthetic identity.

http://www.clausette.cc/politics/#

Is Politics Something “à la Mode”?

“About Fashion”

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The Oxford English Dictionary’s definition of the word ‘fashion’ is “a popular trend; producing and marketing styles of clothing etc.”, only barely verges on the true meaning and potential of fashion. While it often finds itself unjustly dismissed as a subject of frivolity, this is a grave misconception. Fashion’s function is in fact so complex that it is rooted in paradox as it operates on the basis of the amalgamation of opposites. Its effects can mirror the cathartic power of any good piece of art, ranging from awe to tragedy to comedy. It performs as a reputable tool for the sociological study of any given era, race or gender and also acts as both a physical manifestation and stimulus of psychological feelings.

Fashion is a soldier of great valour, honoured with the task of executing its duties in opposing territories. It possesses the ability to serve contradictory purposes through its paradoxical functions. For example, fashion is a means through which one may stand out from the crowd by exemplifying a unique sense of style. But it is also a method of fitting in if one chooses to dress similarly to others. For individuals who yearn for acceptance and approval, fashion can offer a sense of belonging. And for those who do not wish to be seen, fashion can be camouflage from the eyes of the world. However, for others, who view style as creative expression, fashion can be a means of transmitting their skill, embodying their personality and attracting coveted attention. Fashion is reality because of its primary role to clothe you. But it is also fantasy due to its capacity to act as an artistic medium for exhibitions of the imagination, just like paint or words. Fashion’s ambidexterity stems either from an elusive, fleeting nature that makes it incapable of deciding where its allegiances lie; from a tyrannical soul that intends to make us slaves to its limitless power; or from a heroic sense of duty to serve divergent realms.

“About Fashion”, by Nicole Clinton

“About Fashion”

Just my type: how Cooper Black became 2017’s most fashionable font

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It started with an Instagram post. When French online-only retailer Sézane launched its T-shirts, featuring the words “l’amant” written in the typeface Cooper Black, a very modern love affair was sparked between high-street fashion and this most goofy of typefaces. It has been a whirlwind: Topshop now sells a T-shirt that reads “Femme forever” across it in Cooper Black, Pull and Bear’s version reads “Babe with power vibes” and Whistles has one that says “Eh oui” in Cooper Black-inspired letters. It has become the most fashionable font of 2017.

Fashion’s affairs with typefaces have been many – from the Didone styles of Vogue to the sans serifs favoured by Chanel, Commes des Garçons and Fendi. But Cooper Black, described in the graphic design industry’s Eye Magazine as, “as eye-catching as a charging bull and as expressive as carnival barker”, doesn’t have the sleek lines or sophistication you might expect from a sartorial squeeze. For Sarah Hyndman, author of Why Fonts Matter, its round shapes make it “look like a typeface that someone is blowing up like bubblegum – it looks ready to pop.”

https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2017/apr/10/just-my-type-how-cooper-black-became-2017s-most-fashionable-font

Just my type: how Cooper Black became 2017’s most fashionable font