Designers are reinventing that stodgy standby, the men’s suit

designers-are-reinventing-that-stodgy-standby-the-mens-suit

The men’s suit used to have a clear place in the world. Men wore it to work, to dinner, and to cocktails. But times have changed. Corporate dress codes are loosening up. Regard for formality is dwindling. Can the suit remain relevant?

https://qz.com/892958/designers-are-reinventing-that-stodgy-standby-the-mens-suit/

Designers are reinventing that stodgy standby, the men’s suit

#Election2016 USA

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  • Not since NAFTA has US manufacturing been such a hot topic in politics. There are a handful of substantive issues that have come to define this election cycle, one being the loss and possible return of US manufacturing jobs in sectors from automobiles to apparel.

    In the 1960s, more than 95 percent of apparel bought in the US was made in the US. But increased free trade with China, starting in the 1980s, pushed that number down significantly. In 2015, 97 percent of clothes sold in the US were imported, not just from China, but also from other offshore manufacturing centres like Bangladesh, Vietnam, India and Indonesia.

    Now, after years of marketing messages proclaiming product quality and local job creation amongst the benefits of American-made goods, voters are asking: Doesn’t bringing large swaths of manufacturing activity back to the US make sense, for consumers, the economy and society at large?

    BoF examines the disadvantages and opportunities of producing clothing in America [Link in bio]. #Election2016

  • https://www.businessoffashion.com/articles/intelligence/the-myth-of-made-in-america-ttp-agreement
#Election2016 USA

Start anywhere, finish anywhere commerce is future of digital retail: BRP

Retailers are increasingly in tune with consumers’ expectations of personalized, seamless experiences across channels, with 56 percent of brands citing this as a top digital priority going forward, according to a new report by Boston Retail Partners.

As consumers and retailers alike have embraced mobile and online selling, the traditional retail silo model has been broken down to create a bridge between the physical and digital. Likewise, retailers now have a better grasp on bringing consumers an individualized and streamlined shopping experience, wherever, whenever and however they prefer to shop.

Start anywhere, finish anywhere commerce is future of digital retail: BRP

Start anywhere, finish anywhere commerce is future of digital retail: BRP

Yves Is Back at Saint Laurent

Despite focusing on “design, not styling,” for all its low-cut, thigh-high zing, Anthony Vaccarello’s debut played it safe.

PARIS, France — “A clin d’oeil, a wink,” was Anthony Vaccarello’s description of his debut at Saint Laurent on Monday night. He wanted to lighten the legacy he’s inherited. “It’s heavy,” he said. “Everyone has their own interpretation, and I know I can’t please everyone. But neither could Yves.”

Or, he might have added, the handful of designers who have carried the torch since Saint Laurent’s retirement in 2002: Alber Elbaz, Tom Ford, Stefano Pilatiand, most controversially, Hedi Slimane, who has left Vaccarello with a billion-dollar business to sustain. Vaccarello insisted they’d all inspired him in some way, if only because their work for the house consolidated just how strong its design DNA was.

Yves Is Back at Saint Laurent

The Return of the Graphic T-Shirt

A Number of Names* store | Source: Courtesy

A Number of Names* store | Source: Courtesy

LONDON, United Kingdom — Funny, obscene, obscure, retro, rebellious, puerile or tribal — often broadcasting fandom, in-jokes or subcultural affiliation — the humble graphic t-shirt punches far above its weight. For labels, it’s a high volume product with a healthy margin that requires no specialist manufacturing. For consumers, it can be an accessibly priced entry point to an aspirational brand.

In the last decade or so, the over-licensing of graphics linked to cultural lodestars — from The Ramones to Star Wars — and the logo-heavy product of teen retailers like Abercrombie & Fitch have helped drive the graphic t-shirt out of fashion. But, now, retailers, distributors and brands at the trend-sensitive edge are reporting a resurgence of interest in t-shirts, specifically for smaller and hard-to-find labels.

 

https://www.businessoffashion.com/articles/intelligence/the-return-of-the-graphic-t-shirt

The Return of the Graphic T-Shirt